Bond Strategy and Influence Press Screening

Strike A Pose (Opens January 18, IFC Center)

In 1990, seven young male dancers-­‐6 gay, 1 straight -­‐joined Madonna on her most controversial tour. On stage and in the iconic film Truth or Dare, they showed the world how to express yourself. Now, 25 years later, they reveal the truth about life during and after the tour, when they were ambassadors to the world on behalf of the LGBT community during the height of the AIDS epidemic.  STRIKE A POSE is a dramatic tale about overcoming shame and finding the courage to be who you are.

Directed by Ester Gould & Reijer Zwaan Runtime: 85 minutes

What the critics are saying:

"Beyond the personal stories, the movie frames the tour and “Truth or Dare” as landmarks in the push for gay rights and awareness, and makes a convincing case." -The New York Times
Click here to read the entire article.

"A perfect love song by Gould and Zwaan to the exceptional men those boys turned out to be.” - The Huffington Post 

Karl Marx City (Opens March 29, Film Forum)

"Dozens of documentaries have been made about the repressive Communist regimes of the former Eastern bloc, but few have been as visually striking or as deeply personal as Karl Marx City." Hollywood Reporter

Twenty-five years after the collapse of the German Democratic Republic (GDR), filmmaker Petra Epperlein returns to the proletarian Oz of her childhood to find the truth about her late father’s suicide and his rumored Stasi past. Had he been an informant for the secret police? Was her childhood an elaborate fiction? As she looks for answers in the Stasi’s extensive archives, she pulls back the curtain of her own ostalgia and enters the parallel world of the security state, seeing her former life through the lens of the oppressor. Reconstructing everyday GDR life through declassified Stasi surveillance footage, the past plays like dystopian science fiction, providing a chilling backdrop to interrogate the apparatus of control and the meaning of truth in a society where every action and thought was suspect.

God Knows Where I Am (Opens March 31, Lincoln Plaza)

The body of a homeless woman is found in an abandoned New Hampshire farmhouse. Beside the body, lies a diary that documents a journey of starvation and the loss of sanity, but told with poignance, beauty, humor, and spirituality. For nearly four months, Linda Bishop, a prisoner of her own mind, survived on apples and rain water, waiting for God to save her, during one of the coldest winters on record. As her story unfolds from different perspectives, including her own, we learn about our systemic failure to protect those who cannot protect themselves.

Directed by Todd & Jedd Wider.  Runtime: 97 minutes

What the critics are saying:

"God Knows Where I Am—beautiful, haunting and supremely moving—is one of the most powerful documentary films I have seen on America's flawed approach to mental health and homelessness. Essential viewing for anyone seeking to understand the systemic failings of our mental healthcare system, it is at once a work of art and a clarion call to end our neglect of people with mental illnesses.  The film powerfully conveys how an empty commitment to individual liberty has been substituted for a genuine system of mental health treatment and leaves us with one unavoidable conclusion: "we can and must do better.""

-Paul S. Appelbaum, MD
Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine, & Law

“A film of great beauty and tenderness that gradually reveals a confounding mental illness, this film is a human story at its heart. Ultimately, it illuminates a hidden problem of vast proportion with an epic yet intimate cinematic vision.” 

– Jury, Hot Docs

The Settlers (Opens March 3, Film Forum)

 From the Romanian-born, Israeli-raised filmmaker Shimon Dotan, THE SETTLERS traces the history of Israeli settlements in the West Bank and their growth through individual action and, in this telling, the sometimes tacit encouragement of Israeli politicians.  

Interweaving archival footage with current interviews featuring settlers and academics alike, Dotan examines the incremental protests, governmental indifference, and political calculation that have led to the current stalemate in which we've come to know.  Partisans on both sides of the conflict will find plenty to argue with.  The real achievement here is in going beyond the buzzwords of newscasts and talking points to convey a sense of what's happening on the ground-- and give it a sense of urgency.  

Directed by Shimon Dotan  Runtime: 106 minutes

What the critics are saying:

"A compelling, must-see, tour de force."  - The Huffington Post

Notes On Blindness 

After losing sight, John Hull knew that if he did not try to understand blindness it would destroy him. In 1983 he began keeping an audio diary.

Over three years John recorded over sixteen hours of material, a unique testimony of loss, rebirth and renewal, excavating the interior world of blindness.

Published in 1990, the diaries were described by author and neurologist Oliver Sacks as, ‘A masterpiece… The most precise, deep and beautiful account of blindness I have ever read.’

Following on from the Emmy Award-winning short film of the same name, Notes on Blindness is an ambitious and groundbreaking work, both affecting and innovative – and one of the most essential British documentaries of the year.

The film premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival (alongside our virtual reality project), as well as winning the Special Jury Prize at the 59th San Francisco Film Festival and the Wellcome Trust Innovation and Storytelling Award at Sheffield Doc/Fest.

What the critics are saying:

★★★★★  “The genius of the film is in allowing us to understand and visualise the world of blindness… A beautiful, accessible and thoughtful work of art.”  - The Guardian, Charlie Phillips

An Art That Nature Makes

Finding unexpected beauty in the discarded and decayed, photographer Rosamond Purcell has developed an oeuvre of work that has garnered international acclaim, graced the pages of National Geographic and over 20 published books, and has enlisted admirers such as Jonathan Safran Foer, Errol Morris and Stephen Jay Gould. AN ART THAT NATURE MAKES details Purcell’s fascination with the natural world – from a mastodon tooth to a hydrocephalic skull – offering insight into her unique way of recontextualizing objects both ordinary and strange into sometimes disturbing but always breathtaking imagery.

Directed by Molly Bernstein.  Runtime: 75 minutes

What the critics are saying:

"Rosamond Purcell is one of the great photographers. She has captured the history of objects by photographing them in Romantic decline: books scourged by worms, petrified food-stuffs, biological specimens gone wrong, the inexorable entropic winding down of everything."  Errol Morris

"What kind of genius is Rosamond Purcell? Is she an artist? A scholar? A documentarian? A living cabinet of wonders? Her originality defies category…"  Jonathan Safran Foer 

Yarn

Meet the artists who are redefining the tradition of knit and crochet, bringing yarn out of the house and into the world. Reinventing our relationship with this colorful tradition, YARN weaves together wool graffiti artists, circus performers, and structural designers into a visually-striking look at the women who are making a creative stance while building one of modern art's hottest trends.

Directed by Una Lorenzen. Runtime: 76 min

What the critics are saying:

“You have almost certainly never seen a better documentary about yarn than YARN… Thread and String should be jealous."
- New York Times

"It’s an inspiring portrait of a truly feminist mode of art."
- L.A Times

A MIDSUMMER NIGHTS DREAM

TIFF, Official Selection

Of all Shakespeare's plays, A Midsummer Night's Dream is the most phantasmagorical, with fairies, spells and hallucinatory lovers. Julie Taymor turns out a production that's visually breathtaking, funny, sexy and darkly poetic. With cinematography by Rodrigo Prieto (Argo, Frida) and music by Academy Award-winning composer Elliot Goldenthal, this immersive, inventive cinematic experience was filmed during Taymor's highly acclaimed inaugural stage production of A Midsummer Night's Dream. The feats of visual imagination are ingenious and plentiful, but beating at the center of the film is an emotionally moving take on the deeper human aspects of this beloved tale.

Directed by Julie Taymor. Runtime: 145 min

What the critics are saying:

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream that doesn’t so much reach for the heavens as roll around in them, with joyous but calculated abandon...For Ms. Taymor, the sky is not the limit. It’s a supple canvas to be stretched and bent to the whims of the imagination...When the moments are this beautiful, they take root in your mind and assume lives of their own. Don’t be surprised when they start showing up in your own dreams."
- New York Times

“A deliriously beautiful, deeply magical staging that’s as human as it is wildly inventive.”
- Newsday

SOUND OF REDEMPTION

By 15 years old, Frank Morgan was an accomplished saxophonist, playing with the likes of Charlie Parker and Billie Holiday. As his notoriety grew, so did a steady heroin addiction, landing him in and out of jail for over 30 years. With so much incarcerated musical talent, San Quentin in the 1950s held one of the leading 16 man jazz groups in the country. The Sound of Redemption offers a frank look into the ups and downs of Morgan's life and a reflective look at african-american culture in 1950s Los Angeles. Centered around a 2012 tribute to the man in San Quentin penitentiary, friends, musical mentors, ex-lovers, and family look on and reminisce about the happy-sad life of the great Frank Morgan. This documentary is recommended for College and University Music Departments.

Directed by N.C Heikin.  Runtime: 83 minutes

What the critics are saying:

“It’s a fond and forgiving tribute to the man, filled with music that moves beyond happy and sad, and toward something like brilliance.”
- New York Times

“2015 has been a great year for music docs, with films about Amy Winehouse, Nina Simone, Kurt Cobain and the Wrecking Crew all scoring with audiences and critics. And here, at year's end, comes "Sound of Redemption" — as good as any.”
- Los Angeles Times